24-Hour Hotline

877-322-7272

 220 S. Burlington Ave. Suite 4

Hastings, Nebraska 68901

 402-463-5810

communityed@hastingssasa.com

LEARN MORE HERE WITH A LIST OF HELPFUL RESOURCES

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Upcoming Events:

Mardi Gras Fundraiser

March 12, 2016: Join us for our largest fundraiser of the year!

 

Denim Day 2016

April 27th: You and your business can help raise awareness  about the issue of sexual violence by wearing denim

A pattern of behavior that may include: emotional, psychological, and physical abuse. Also, threats, coercion, stalking, isolation, intimidation, sexual, and economic abuse all fall under the definition of domestic violence.

SUPPORTING SURVIVORS

SASA believes that supporting victims of domestic violence and sexual violence is a powerful tool. Here are some tips on providing support to survivors.

At SASA in Hastings Nebraska, we offer a variety of services to help educate, advocate, and eliminate domestic violence in South Central Nebraska.

 

SASA provides support, guidance, and education to men, women and children to live a life free from domestic and sexual violence.

 

OFRECEMOS SERVICIOS EN ESPAÑOL.

 

24-Hour Hotline

Our crisis hotline provides survivors and the community with support, information, and referrals. All calls are confidential and callers have the option to remain anonymous. * Please note that our 24-hour hotline is not a direct line for immediate assistance. If emergency support is needed please call 911 immediately.

 

Emergency Support

Emergency Shelter

Our shelter strives to provide an individual’s or a family’s basic needs when they leave their home due to intimate partner violence, sexual violence, stalking, dating violence, and sex trafficking.

 

Emergency Transportation

Emergency transportation to shelter is available 24 hours a day. Transportation is also provided to necessary resource agencies, medical, and court appointments.

 

Believe them

If someone tells you about an experience of abuse or assault, believe them and let them know that you believe them. There is little evidence to show that people create these stories. Many survivors do not tell anyone because of the fear they may not be believed or it would make things worse.

 

DON'T BLAME THEM

It is never the victim's fault, but survivors often blame themselves, so they don't need others to blame them as well. They might think something they did or didn't do is the reason they were assaulted. Reassure them that the only one responsible for the assault is the offender.

 

EXPRESS YOUR CONCERNS

Without judging, focus on the reality of the situation. Try say something such as, "This injury shows me you are in danger," "I'm afraid for you," or "You don't deserve this."

 

BE AWARE OF ABUSER TACTICS

Many abusers isolate their partners and keep them away from family and friends, trying to undermine friendships and creating dependence. In sexual assault, realize that offenders work hard to lower the victim's defenses and create reasons to blame them for not being alone. In both cases, remind the victim that they are not alone.

 

RESPECT THEM

People who have experienced domestic or sexual violence are the victim of someone else's choice, but they are also survivors. They have experienced a life-threatening event and lived to tell about it. They deserve respect for surviving the injury.

 

LISTEN TO THEM

Survivors need to talk about their experiences, sometimes over and over again. Help them vent painful feelings, and let them know you'll listen. However, don't force them to talk until they are ready.

 

learn more here with a list of resources

PROVIDE SURVIVOR SUPPORT

Our Mission

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To be a source of help, hope, safety, and inspiration to survivors of domestic and sexual violence. We embrace and focus on the story of each individual with deep concern and care in order to understand, facilitate, advocate, and support.

SASA Crisis Center | 220 S. Burlington Ave. Suite 4 | Hastings, Nebraska 68901 | 402-463-5810 | executivedirector@hastingssasa.com

Project supported by Administration of Children and Families through the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (G-1501NEFVPS).

 The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this site are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Adinistration of Children and Families.