Domestic Violence

                                                           
DEFINITION OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE:
Domestic Violence is defined as an intentional pattern of behavior that may include: emotional, psychological, and physical abuse. Also, threats, coercion, stalking, isolation, intimidation, sexual, and economic abuse all fall under the definition of domestic violence.

TACTICS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE:

· Screaming and Yelling
· Pushing and Shoving
· Throwing Objects
· Punching Holes in Walls
· Driving Out of Control
· Threats and Intimidation
· Controlling Finances
· Isolation from Family, Friends, Job and School
· Jealousy and Possessiveness
· Using Children to Manipulate
· Physical Attacks
· Forced Sexual Contact

WHO DOES IT AFFECT?
Domestic Violence can happen to anyone. It does not discriminate on the basis of economic status, culture, ethnicity, education, family structure, religion, sexual orientation or age.
Being the victim is painful and embarrassing, and too often, they are blamed for not leaving. Abusive partners destroy healthy environments and deprive victims of independence, in order to remove their power to seek help or find resources to leave.

Domestic violence affects each person in the community. We all suffer from the costs of domestic violence in our community. We cover for missed work days of co-workers, emergency room and hospital costs, school programs with children, insurance costs and a loss of friends, family and work mates. It is important that we begin to think of domestic violence as our business, and that we should get involved. Domestic violence will not stop on it's own, it needs the help of the community.

By exposing the secrets of the violence in our community, we are building strong families and a better community. By educating ourselves and others in the community we can help expose the violence still happening behind closed doors, next door and at our work sites. It is only by that exposure that the offenders of violence lose their power to dominate the lives of those they live with.

By calling SASA, you are only taking a chance on gaining strength. SASA does not make the decision for you to leave or stay. We help you see options for you and your children. We listen; we show you some possible ideas that might make your life more palatable for you. We only hope to assist you in making a plan for safety. Plans are not concrete; we do not call the police or ask you to do so. We support you in your plans and assist you as you move forward in your own life.
WHO ELSE DOES IT AFFECT?
According to the U.S. Department of Justice, 10% of all violent crimes committed last year, were by the victim’s intimate partner.
One out of every four women in the United States is physically abused by her partner on a regular basis.
Overall, rape has the highest annual victim cost at $127 billion (excluding child sex abuse).
No matter what the situation, remember:
YOU ARE THE VICTIM. NO ONE DESERVES TO BE ABUSED. NO ONE.
CALL SASA IF YOU HAVE BEEN THE VICTIM OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.
WE ARE HERE TO HELP.
SASA HOTLINE – (402)463-4677
CALLS ARE ANSWERED 24-HOURS A DAY

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